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WHAT IS HE WORTH TO YOU? In   World   War   II,   the   late   Senator   George   McGovern   of   South   Dakota   was   a   B-24   pilot,   who   flew   missions against   Axis   targets   in   Germany,   Austria,   the   Balkans,   and   Italy.      On   March   14,   1945,   he   had   just   dropped   his   load   of bombs   over   a   target   and   was   making   his   turn   toward   home   base   when   one   of   his   crewmen   informed   him   that   a 500-pound   bomb   had   stuck   in   the   rack.      Since   it   was   much   too   dangerous   to   try   to   land   with   unused   bombs,   the ordinary   procedure   was   to   drop   them   harmlessly   in   the   sea.      However,   this   time   their   flight   path   took   them   over land.      Two   of   the   crew   members   struggled   to   get   the   bomb   dislodged,   and   a   sudden   upward   lurch   of   the   plane   told everyone   that   they   had   finally   been   successful.      “McGovern   watched   the   bomb   descend.   …      ‘It   went   down   and   hit right   on   a   farm   in   that   beautiful,   green   part   of   Austria.      …      It   couldn’t   have   come   in   more   perfectly.      If   we   had   been trying   to   hit   it   we   couldn’t   have   hit   it   as   square.”      Another   observing   crewman   said,   “It   just   blew   the   farm   to smithereens.”      McGovern   added,   “Here   was   this   peaceful   area.      They   thought   they   were   safely   out   of   the   war   zone.     Nothing   there   …   .      Just   a   family   eating   a   noon   meal.      It   made   me   sick   to   my   stomach.”      When   McGovern   got   back   to base,   he   got   word   that   his   wife   had   given   birth   to   their   first   child.      Though   elated   by   the   news,   the   irony   of   having just given life, and taken it, intensified his feelings. Precisely     forty     years     later,     McGovern     was lecturing   in   Austria,   when   a   television   station   asked to   interview   him   for   its   documentary   on   World   War   II.     During   the   interview,   McGovern   told   the   story   of   the farmhouse   destroyed   by   the   bomb   jettisoned   from his   plane.      He   said,   “…The   thought   went   through   my mind   then   and   on   many,   many   days   since   then,   that we    brought    a    young    baby    into    the    world    and probably killed someone else’s baby or children.” When   the   documentary   was   televised,   the   station   received   a   call   from   a   man   who   said   he   was   the   owner   of the   farm   hit   by   that   bomb.      He   said,   “I   want   you   to   tell   him   …   I   despised   Adolf   Hitler.      We   did   see   the   bomber coming.      I   got   my   wife   and   children   out   of   the   house   and   we   hid   in   a   ditch   and   no   one   was   hurt.      And   because   of   our attitude   about   Hitler,   I   thought   at   the   time   that   if   bombing   our   farm   reduced   the   length   of   that   war   by   one   hour   or one minute, it was well worth it” (Stephen Ambrose, The Wild Blue , 229-233,262,263). This   man   hated   Hitler   so   much   that   it   was   worth   the   loss   of   his   farm   just   to   be   rid   of   him   a   little   sooner.      Yet, if   hatred   can   be   so   strong,   how   much   stronger   must   love   be?      Indeed,   love   caused   Jesus   Himself   to   give   His   life   for sinners.      The   question,   then,   for   any   one   of   them   is,   “How   much   are   you   willing   to   lose   for   Christ?”      The   answer   of   so many   seems   to   be,   “Very   little.”      Most   seem   unwilling   to   give   up   even   their   comforts   and   conveniences,   much   less their   livelihoods   and   lives.      This   is   due   to   a   lack   of   faith   in   Jesus   and   ignorance   of   what   allegiance   to   Him   requires.     Jesus   said,   “For   whoever   wishes   to   save   his   life   shall   lose   it,   but   whoever   loses   his   life   for   My   sake,   he   is   the   one who   will   save   it”   (Luke   9:24).      Yes,    to   save   one’s   life,   he   must   lose   it .      Yet,   the   trade-off   is   “out   of   this   world.”      Jesus does   not   ask   those   who   come   to   Him   to   lose   anything   ultimately,   but   just   to   trust   Him   in   exchanging   a   home   which is illusory and temporary for one which is real and eternal.  Nothing ever has been, or ever will be, more “worth it.”
“Jesus   said,   "Truly   I   say   to   you,   there   is   no   one   who   has   left   house   or   brothers   or   sisters   or   mother   or   father   or   children or   farms,   for   My   sake   and   for   the   gospel's   sake,   but   that   he   shall   receive   a   hundred   times   as much   now   in   the   present   age,   houses   and   brothers   and   sisters   and   mothers   and   children   and farms, along with persecutions; and in the age to come, eternal life” (Mark 10:29,30).
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“Jesus   said,   "Truly   I   say   to   you,   there   is   no   one   who   has   left   house   or   brothers   or sisters   or   mother   or   father   or   children   or   farms,   for   My   sake and    for    the    gospel's    sake,    but    that    he    shall    receive    a hundred   times   as   much   now   in   the   present   age,   houses   and brothers   and   sisters   and   mothers   and   children   and   farms, along with persecutions; and in the age to come, eternal life” (Mark 10:29,30).
WHAT IS HE WORTH TO YOU? In   World   War   II,   the   late   Senator   George   McGovern   of   South   Dakota   was   a   B-24   pilot,   who flew   missions   against   Axis   targets   in   Germany,   Austria,   the   Balkans,   and   Italy.      On   March   14, 1945,   he   had   just   dropped   his   load   of   bombs   over   a   target   and   was   making   his   turn   toward home   base   when   one   of   his   crewmen   informed   him   that   a   500-pound   bomb   had   stuck   in   the rack.      Since   it   was   much   too   dangerous   to   try   to   land   with   unused   bombs,   the   ordinary procedure   was   to   drop   them   harmlessly   in   the   sea.      However,   this   time   their   flight   path   took them   over   land.      Two   of   the   crew   members   struggled   to   get   the   bomb   dislodged,   and   a sudden   upward   lurch   of   the   plane   told   everyone   that   they   had   finally   been   successful.     “McGovern   watched   the   bomb   descend.   …      ‘It   went   down   and   hit   right   on   a   farm   in   that beautiful,   green   part   of   Austria.      …      It   couldn’t   have   come   in   more   perfectly.      If   we   had   been trying   to   hit   it   we   couldn’t   have   hit   it   as   square.”      Another   observing   crewman   said,   “It   just blew   the   farm   to   smithereens.”      McGovern   added,   “Here   was   this   peaceful   area.      They thought   they   were   safely   out   of   the   war   zone.      Nothing   there   …   .      Just   a   family   eating   a noon   meal.      It   made   me   sick   to   my   stomach.”      When   McGovern   got   back   to   base,   he   got   word that   his   wife   had   given   birth   to   their   first   child.      Though   elated   by   the   news,   the   irony   of having just given life, and taken it, intensified his feelings. Precisely   forty   years   later,   McGovern   was lecturing    in    Austria,    when    a    television    station asked    to    interview    him    for    its    documentary    on World   War   II.      During   the   interview,   McGovern   told the    story    of    the    farmhouse    destroyed    by    the bomb   jettisoned   from   his   plane.      He   said,   “…The thought    went    through    my    mind    then    and    on many,   many   days   since   then,   that   we   brought   a   young   baby   into   the   world   and   probably killed someone else’s baby or children.” When   the   documentary   was   televised,   the   station   received   a   call   from   a   man   who said   he   was   the   owner   of   the   farm   hit   by   that   bomb.      He   said,   “I   want   you   to   tell   him   …   I despised   Adolf   Hitler.      We   did   see   the   bomber   coming.      I   got   my   wife   and   children   out   of   the house   and   we   hid   in   a   ditch   and   no   one   was   hurt.      And   because   of   our   attitude   about   Hitler,   I thought   at   the   time   that   if   bombing   our   farm   reduced   the   length   of   that   war   by   one   hour   or one minute, it was well worth it” (Stephen Ambrose, The Wild Blue , 229-233,262,263). This   man   hated   Hitler   so   much   that   it   was   worth   the   loss   of   his   farm   just   to   be   rid   of him   a   little   sooner.      Yet,   if   hatred   can   be   so   strong,   how   much   stronger   must   love   be?     Indeed,   love   caused   Jesus   Himself   to   give   His   life   for   sinners.      The   question,   then,   for   any one   of   them   is,   “How   much   are   you   willing   to   lose   for   Christ?”      The   answer   of   so   many seems    to    be,    “Very    little.”        Most    seem    unwilling    to    give    up    even    their    comforts    and conveniences,   much   less   their   livelihoods   and   lives.      This   is   due   to   a   lack   of   faith   in   Jesus and   ignorance   of   what   allegiance   to   Him   requires.      Jesus   said,   “For   whoever   wishes   to   save his   life   shall   lose   it,   but   whoever   loses   his   life   for   My   sake,   he   is   the   one   who   will   save   it” (Luke   9:24).      Yes,    to   save   one’s   life,   he   must   lose   it .      Yet,   the   trade-off   is   “out   of   this   world.”     Jesus   does   not   ask   those   who   come   to   Him   to   lose   anything   ultimately,   but   just   to   trust   Him in   exchanging   a   home   which   is   illusory   and   temporary   for   one   which   is   real   and   eternal.     Nothing ever has been, or ever will be, more “worth it.”
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