Lt.    John    Kreigshauser    was    at    the    controls    of    his crippled   American   B-17   on   February   22,   1944   and   striving   with all   the   skills   at   his   command   to   get   it   safely   back   to   England.     Dubbed   the   “Mi   Amigo,”   meaning   “my   friend”   in   Spanish,   the WWII   bomber   was   carrying   ten   American   airmen,   and   had been   badly   shot   up   on   its   mission   to   bomb   a   German   airfield in    Nazi-occupied    Denmark.        It    had    already    jettisoned    its 4,000-pound   payload   of   bombs   in   the   North   Sea,   but   the plane’s   failing   engines   told   the   pilots   they   were   not   going   to be   able   to   make   it   to   their   landing   strip.      Then,   as   hope began    to    fade,    the    pilots    spotted    a    park    in    Sheffield, England,   where   they   might   be   able   to   make   a   crash   landing.     However,   just   as   they   approached, they   saw   a   group   of   young   boys playing       exactly       where       they needed   to   land.      One   of   those   boys was    eight-year-old    Tony    Foulds.      As   Tony   tells   the   story,   he   saw   the pilots        waving        their        hands, apparently   trying   to   signal   to   the boys   to   get   out   of   the   way,   but   it was    too    late.        Rather,    than    risk killing   the   boys,   the   pilots   flew   on and   crashed   into   a   nearby   hill.      All those on board died. Seventy-five    years    later,    a    memorial    stone    with    a plaque,   surrounded   by   ten   oak   trees,   marks   the   crash   site, and,   since   1969,   a   service   has   been   conducted   there   on   the anniversary   of   the   crash.      On   the   seventh-fifth   anniversary, American   planes   will   conduct   a   memorial   flyover   of   the   site.     Tony   Foulds,   now   in   his   eighties,   all   these   years   later   still experiences   pangs   of   grief   and   guilt,   as   he   contemplates even   his   indirect   responsibility   for   the   deaths   of   these   ten men.  He is convinced that they died to save his life or, as he
“For   while   we   were   still helpless,     at     the     right time   Christ   died   for   the ungodly.        For    one    will hardly   die   for   a   righteous man;   though   perhaps   for the   good   man   someone would   dare   even   to   die.     But     God     demonstrates His   own   love   toward   us, in   that   while   we   were   yet sinners,    Christ    died    for us ” (Romans 5:6-8).
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himself,   puts   it,   “It’s   me   that   killed   them.”      He   visits   the   site almost   daily   to   weep   over,   speak   to,   and   remember   the dead   airmen   who,   though   strangers,   gave   their   lives   for him. This    moving    story    is    reminiscent    of    the    sacrifice Christ   made   on   the   cross.      Yet,   Christ’s   sacrifice   is   greater for   several   reasons.      First ,   it   was   Christ,   the   very   Son   of   God, who   died,   and   not   a   human   who   died   for   humans.      Second , Christ   died,   not   for   innocent   children,   and   not   just   for   those who    never    knew    Him,    but    for    those    who    were    actually hostile   to   Him   in   their   sins.      Indeed,   most   of   those   for   whom He   died   never   appreciate,   recall,   or   respond   to   the   sacrifice He   made   for   them.      Third ,   the   sacrifice   of   Christ   holds   such potential   value   that   it   is   sufficient   to   save,   not   just   a   few boys,   but   the   whole   world   (1   John   2:2).      Fourth ,   Christ   died, not   just   to   extend   people’s   earthly   lives,   but   to   give   them an eternity with God in heaven (1 Peter 3:18). The   only   tree   remembered in   connection   with   Jesus’   death   is the   one   on   which   He   died,   the   only stone    the    one    which    the    angel rolled    away    from    His    tomb    to signify    His    resurrection,    and    the only   memorial   the   one   which   His disciples   observe   every   Sunday   in the   Lord’s   Supper.      Yet,   because they   know   that   He   died   that   they might   live,   they   also   memorialize His     sacrificial     death     for     them every   day   of   their   lives   in   the   way   they   live   them.      They   do this   because   they   know   that   they   owe   Him   everything,   since it   was   their   sins   that   put   Him   on   the   cross.      Because   He   died for   them,   they   live   for   Him,   and   each   one   claims   Him   daily as “my Friend.”
MI AMIGO
Mi AMIGO
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“For   while   we   were   still   helpless,   at   the   right   time   Christ   died   for   the   ungodly.     For   one   will   hardly   die   for   a   righteous   man;   though   perhaps   for   the   good   man someone   would   dare   even   to   die.      But   God   demonstrates   His   own   love   toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us ” (Romans 5:6-8).
Lt.    John    Kreigshauser    was    at the   controls   of   his   crippled   American   B- 17    on    February    22,    1944    and    striving with   all   the   skill   at   his   command   to   get it   safely   back   to   England.      Dubbed   the “Mi    Amigo,”    meaning    “my    friend”    in Spanish,      the      WWII      bomber      was carrying   ten   American   airmen,   and   had been   badly   shot   up   on   its   mission   to bomb     a     German     airfield     in     Nazi- occupied    Denmark.        It    had    already jettisoned   its   4,000-pound   payload   of bombs     in     the     North     Sea,     but     the plane’s   failing   engines   told   the   pilots they   were   not   going   to   be   able   to   make it   to   their   landing   strip.      Then,   as   hope began    to    fade,    the    pilots    spotted    a park   in   Sheffield,   England,   where   they might   be   able   to   make   a   crash   landing.     However,   just   as   they   approached,   they saw    a    group    of    young    boys    playing exactly    where    they    needed    to    land.      One   of   those   boys   was   eight-year-old Tony    Foulds.      As   Tony   tells the   story,   he saw            the pilots   waving their     hands,   trying           to signal   to   the boys    to    get out     of     the way,     but     it was   too   late.     Rather,   than   risk   killing   the   boys,   the pilots    flew    on    and    crashed    into    a nearby hill.  All those on board died. Seventy-five     years     later,     a memorial      stone      with      a      plaque, surrounded   by   ten   oak   trees,   marks   the crash   site   and,   since   1969,   a   service   has been       conducted       there       on       the anniversary     of     the     crash.          On     the seventh-fifth      anniversary,      American planes   will   conduct   a   memorial   flyover of    the    site.        Tony    Foulds,    now    in    his eighties,     all     these     years     later     still experiences   pangs   of   grief   and   guilt,   as he     contemplates     even     his     indirect responsibility for the deaths of these 
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ten  men.  He   is  convinced  that  they died   to   save   his   life,   or,   as   he   himself, puts   it,   “It’s   me   that   killed   them.”      He visits    the    site    almost    daily    to    weep over,   speak   to,   and   remember   the   dead airmen    who,    though    strangers,    gave their lives for him. This          moving          story          is reminiscent   of   the   sacrifice   Christ   made on   the   cross.      Yet,   Christ’s   sacrifice   is greater    for    several    reasons.        First ,    it was   Christ,   the   very   Son   of   God,   who died,    and    not    a    human    who    died    for humans.        Second ,    Christ    died,    not    for innocent   children,   and   not   just   for   those who   never   knew   Him,   but   for   those   who were    actually    hostile    to    Him    in    their sins.      Indeed,   most   of   those   for   whom He    died    never    appreciate,    recall,    or respond    to    the    sacrifice    He    made    for them.      Third ,   the   sacrifice   of   Christ   holds such   potential   value   that   it   is   sufficient to   save,   not   just   a   few   boys,   but   the whole   world   (1   John   2:2).      Fourth ,   Christ died,   not   just   to   extend   people’s   earthly lives,   but   to   give   them   an   eternity   with God in heaven (1 Peter 3:18). T     h     e       only              tree remembered   in   with          Jesus’ death      is      the one     on     which He      died,      the only   stone   the one    which    the angel         rolled away   from   His tomb    to    signify    His    resurrection,    and the    only    memorial    the    one    which    His disciples   observe   every   Sunday   in   the Lord’s   Supper.      Yet,   because   they   know that   He   died   that   they   might   live,   they also    memorialize    His    sacrificial    death for   them   every   day   of   their   lives   in   the way    they    live    them.        They    do    this because   they   know   that   they   owe   Him everything,   since   it   was   their   sins   that put   Him   on   the   cross.      Because   He   died for   them,   they   live   for   Him,   and   each one claims Him daily as “my Friend.”
MI AMIGO