IN THE EYE OF THE HURRICANE In   the   Indian   Ocean,   hurricanes   are   aptly   called   “cyclones,”   from   the   Greek   word,   kuklos , meaning   “circle,”   because   their   winds   rotate   around   a   center   point   known   as   “the   eye.”      If   the eye   of   a   hurricane   moves   directly   over   a   person,   he   finds   himself   in   calm   weather.      If   he   didn’t know   any   better,   he   might   think   that   the   calm   of   the   hurricane’s   eye   was   just   another pleasant   day.      Yet,   the   eye   of   the   hurricane   soon   moves   on   and   he   is   hit   by   the   fierce   and devastating   wall   of   wind   on   the   other   side.      The   calm   he   experienced   in   the   eye   proved   to   be just   an   illusory   interlude   —   a   brief   “lull   before   the   storm.”      Therefore,   he   would   be   a   fool   to think   that   the   calm   of   the   hurricane’s   eye   means   that   the   worst   is   over   and   that   he   may return to life as it was. Such   is   life.      It   is   like   a   hurricane   with   its   eye.      Its   problems   come   and   go   —   and   come again.      Life   involves   encountering   and   resolving   an   unending   series   of   problems.      Not   only   are there   smaller   category   one   and   two   “hurricanes,”   but   there   are   the   intermediate   category threes   and,   sometimes,   even   the   category   fours   and   fives.      When   life’s   problems   or   crises   hit, we   move   through   the   “eye   wall”   of   a   storm   before   God,   in   His   great   mercy,   gives   us   the   calm of   “the   eye”   to   catch   our   breath   and   prepare   to   be   hit   by   the   other   side   of   the   wall,   which   is surely   to   come.      However,   we   might   easily   be   lulled   into   thinking,   while   enjoying   the   brief   calm of   the   eye   that,   going   forward,   this   is   the   way   life   will   always   be   —   until   the   opposite   eye   wall hits   and   shatters   our   delusion.      The   writer   of   Ecclesiastes   makes   this   very   point   in   the   first few   chapters   of   his   book   when   he   reminds   us   of   the   cyclical,   repetitive   nature   of   life.      He brings   this   point   to   a   climax   in   the   passage   which   begins   with   the   memorable   words,   “To every   thing   there   is   a   season   …”   (Eccl.   3:1ff).      The   time   of   love   will   eventually   give   way   to   a time to hate, and vice versa. This   raises   two   additional   thoughts.      First,   not   only   do   the   storms   of   life   fade   as   they yield   to   the   “eyes”   of   resolutions,   but   so   do   life’s   pleasures.      They   fade,   if   only   because   those who   have   enjoyed   them   find   them   losing   their   novelty.      Ecclesiastes   quotes   the   old   man   as saying   of   his   latter   days,   “I   have   no   pleasure   in   them”   (12:1).      The   writer   of   Hebrews   refers   to the   “pleasures   of   sin”   which   last   “for   a   season.”      Life’s   pleasures   are   seasonal.      As   surely   as they   come,   just   as   surely   they   will   go.      Those   who   are   tempted   to   trade   in   their   faith   for   the bright baubles of sin would do well to remember this. Second,   life   itself   is   lived   “in   the   eye   of   the   hurricane.”      Life   is   a   series   of   alternating storms   and   “eyes”   within   a   larger   “eye.”         A   storm   of   judgment   is   coming.      “In   whirlwind   and storm   is   His   way”   (Nah.   1:3).      Many   who   now   live   as   if   they   were   in   the   eye   of   the   hurricane think   that   it   will   always   be   so.      Yet,   the   writer   of   Hebrews   warns   that   “it   is   appointed   for   men to   die   once   and   after   this   comes   the   judgment   …”   (Heb.   9:27).      Yes,   there   is   an   eternal   storm   of condemnation   coming.      From   it   there   will   be   no   relief,   unless   it   is   first   found   in   Christ,   the eternal “eye of the storm,” who will give to those who seek Him its calm atmosphere forever.
There is an appointed time for everything. And there is a time for every event under heaven — a time to give birth, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to uproot what is planted.  A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to tear down, and a time to build up.  A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance.  A time to throw stones, and a time to gather stones; a time to embrace, and a time to shun embracing.  A time to search, and a time to give up as lost; a time to keep, and a time to throw away.  A time to tear apart, and a time to sew together; a time to be silent, and a time to speak.  A time to love, and a time to hate; a time for war, and a time for peace (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8).
Hurricane Isabel, 2003 HOME HOME
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               There   is   an   appointed   time   for   everything. And   there   is   a   time   for   every   event under   heaven   —   a   time   to   give   birth,   and   a   time   to   die;   a   time   to   plant,   and   a   time to   uproot   what   is   planted.     A   time   to   kill,   and   a   time   to   heal;   a   time   to   tear   down, and   a   time   to   build   up.     A   time   to   weep,   and   a   time   to   laugh;   a   time   to   mourn,   and a   time   to   dance.      A   time   to   throw   stones,   and   a   time   to   gather   stones;   a   time   to embrace,   and   a   time   to   shun   embracing.     A   time   to   search,   and   a   time   to   give   up as   lost;   a   time   to   keep,   and   a   time   to   throw   away.     A   time   to   tear   apart,   and   a   time to   sew   together;   a   time   to   be   silent,   and   a   time   to   speak.      A   time   to   love,   and   a time to hate; a time for war, and a time for peace (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8).
IN THE EYE OF THE HURRICANE In   the   Indian   Ocean,   hurricanes   are   aptly   called   “cyclones,” from    the    Greek    word,    kuklos ,    meaning    “circle,”    because    their winds   rotate   around   a   center   point   known   as   “the   eye.”      If   the   eye of   a   hurricane   moves   directly   over   a   person,   he   finds   himself   in calm   weather.      If   he   didn’t   know   any   better,   he   might   think   that the   calm   of   the   hurricane’s   eye   was   just   another   pleasant   day.     Yet,   the   eye   of   the   hurricane   soon   moves   on   and   he   is   hit   by   the fierce   and   devastating   wall   of   wind   on   the   other   side.      The   calm he   experienced   in   the   eye   proved   to   be   just   an   illusory   interlude   a   brief   “lull   before   the   storm.”      Therefore,   he   would   be   a   fool   to think   that   the   calm   of   the   hurricane’s   eye   means   that   the   worst   is over and that he may return to life as it was. Such   is   life.      It   is   like   a   hurricane   with   its   eye.      Its   problems come   and   go   —   and   come   again.      Life   involves   encountering   and resolving   an   unending   series   of   problems.      Not   only   are   there smaller   category   one   and   two   “hurricanes,”   but   there   are   the intermediate   category   threes   and,   sometimes,   even   the   category fours   and   fives.      When   life’s   problems   or   crises   hit,   we   move through   the   “eye   wall”   of   a   storm   before   God,   in   His   great   mercy, gives   us   the   calm   of   “the   eye”   to   catch   our   breath   and   prepare   to be   hit   by   the   other   side   of   the   wall,   which   is   surely   to   come.     However,   we   might   easily   be   lulled   into   thinking,   while   enjoying the   brief   calm   of   the   eye   that,   going   forward,   this   is   the   way   life will   always   be   —   until   the   opposite   eye   wall   hits   and   shatters   our delusion.      The   writer   of   Ecclesiastes   makes   this   very   point   in   the first   few   chapters   of   his   book   when   he   reminds   us   of   the   cyclical, repetitive   nature   of   life.      He   brings   this   point   to   a   climax   in   the passage   which   begins   with   the   memorable   words,   “To   every   thing there   is   a   season   …”   (Eccl.   3:1ff).      The   time   of   love   will   eventually give way to a time to hate, and vice versa. This   raises   two   additional   thoughts.      First,   not   only   do   the storms   of   life   fade   as   they   yield   to   the   “eyes”   of   resolutions,   but so   do   life’s   pleasures.      They   fade,   if   only   because   those   who   have enjoyed   them   find   them   losing   their   novelty.      Ecclesiastes   quotes the   old   man   as   saying   of   his   latter   days,   “I   have   no   pleasure   in them”   (12:1).      The   writer   of   Hebrews   refers   to   the   “pleasures   of sin”   which   last   “for   a   season.”      Life’s   pleasures   are   seasonal.      As surely   as   they   come,   just   as   surely   they   will   go.      Those   who   are tempted   to   trade   in   their   faith   for   the   bright   baubles   of   sin   would do well to remember this. Second,   life   itself   is   lived   “in   the   eye   of   the   hurricane.”     Life   is   a   series   of   alternating   storms   and   “eyes”   within   a   larger “eye.”         A   storm   of   judgment   is   coming.      “In   whirlwind   and   storm   is His   way”   (Nah.   1:3).      Many   who   now   live   as   if   they   were   in   the   eye of   the   hurricane   think   that   it   will   always   be   so.      Yet,   the   writer   of Hebrews   warns   that   “it   is   appointed   for   men   to   die   once   and   after this   comes   the   judgment   …”   (Heb.   9:27).      Yes,   there   is   an   eternal storm   of   condemnation   coming.      From   it   there   will   be   no   relief, unless   it   is   first   found   in   Christ,   the   eternal   “eye   of   the   storm,” who will give to those who seek Him its calm atmosphere forever.
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