“Now   Dinah   the   daughter   of   Leah,   whom   she   had   borne   to   Jacob,   went   out   to   visit   the   daughters   of   the   land.     And when   Shechem   the   son   of   Hamor   the   Hivite,   the   prince   of   the   land,   saw   her,   he   took   her   and   lay   with   her   by   force.      And   he was   deeply   attracted   to   Dinah   the   daughter   of   Jacob,   and   he   loved   the   girl   and   spoke   tenderly   to   her.      So   Shechem   spoke   to his   father   Hamor,   saying,   ‘Get   me   this   young   girl   for   a   wife.’   …      But   Jacob’s   sons   answered   Shechem   and   his   father   Hamor, with   deceit,   and   spoke   to   them,   because   he   had   defiled   Dinah   their   sister   …,      ‘Only   on   this   condition   will   we   consent   to   you: if   you   will   become   like   us,   in   that   every   male   of   you   be   circumcised.’   …     And   all   who   went   out   of   the   gate   of   his   city   listened to   Hamor   and   to   his   son   Shechem,   and   every   male   was   circumcised,   all   who   went   out   of   the   gate   of   his   city.      Now   it   came about   on   the   third   day,   when   they   were   in   pain,   that   two   of   Jacob’s   sons,   Simeon   and   Levi,   Dinah’s   brothers,   each   took   his sword   and   came   upon   the   city   unawares,   and   killed   every   male.   …      Then   Jacob   said   to   Simeon   and   Levi,   ‘You   have   brought trouble   on   me,   by   making   me   odious   among   the   inhabitants   of   the   land,   among   the   Canaanites   and   the   Perizzites;   and   my men   being   few   in   number,   they   will   gather   together   against   me   and   attack   me   and   I   shall   be   destroyed,   I   and   my   household.’     But they said, ‘Should he treat our sister as a harlot?’” (Genesis 32:1-4,13,15,24,25,30,31).
Everybody Makes Mistakes It   is   true   that   all   people   make   mistakes,   or   sin.      This   truth   is   captured   in   the   famous   proverb   expressed by   the   18 th    century   English   poet,   Alexander   Pope,   when   he   said,   “To   err   is   human;   to   forgive,   divine.”      The Bible confirms it in Paul’s statement, “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23). On   the   other   hand,   “everybody   makes   mistakes”   might   often   be   expressed   as   a   means   of   relieving   guilt for   mistakes   made.     As   such,   it   is   an   excellent   illustration   of   the   fallacy   of   “moral   equivalency,”   which   treats   all sins as if they were equal.  They are not. Yes,   everybody   makes   mistakes,   but,   first,   not   everybody   exacerbates   their   mistakes   by   continuing them.        Christians    are    not    distinctive    by    virtue    of    the    fact    that    they    are    perfect,    while    everybody    else    is imperfect.      Instead,   they   are   distinguished   by   the   fact   that,   when   they   do   make   mistakes,   or   sin,   they   repent   of them   and   strive   for   improvement.      They   do   not   continue   to   wallow   in   the   mire   of   sin   and   console   themselves with    the    thought    that    at    least    everybody    else    is    in    the    mire    with    them.        Rather,    they    get    up    and    clean themselves off by the blood of Christ and try to do better the next time. Second,   not   all   sins   are   equal.      Some   have   more   serious,   even   irreparable,   consequences   and,   thus, require   a   heart   which   can   contemplate   those   consequences   but   still   be   indifferent   to   the   hurt   they   cause   others.     It   would   be   ridiculous   for   the   murderer   to   say,   “At   least   I   don’t   litter.”      Victims   of   littering   usually   survive; victims   of   murder   do   not.      Jesus   said   to   Pilate,   “…   He   who   delivered   Me   up   to   you   has   the    greater   sin.”   (Jn. 19:11). When   Jacob’s   sons   responded   to   the   rebuke   of   their   father   for   the   murder   of   the   Shechemites   by saying,   “Should   he   treat   our   sister   as   a   harlot?”   they   were   attempting   to   justify   themselves   by   an   appeal   to moral   equivalency.      Shechem’s   sexual   crime,   as   bad   as   it   was,   did   not   warrant   murdering   and   pillaging   a   whole city. Even   though   all   mistakes,   or   sins,   do   not   rise   to   the   same   level   of   seriousness,   all   sins   require   the   same remedy:      the   blood   of   Christ,   which   is   made   available   to   them   for   their   cleansing,   as   they   repent   of   their   sins.     So,   the   solution   to   the   sin   in   a   person’s   life   is   not   to   excuse,   ignore,   or   minimize   it   by   implying   that   he   is   no worse than anybody else, but to repent of sin and stop it.
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“Now   Dinah   the   daughter   of   Leah,   whom   she   had   borne   to   Jacob,   went out   to   visit   the   daughters   of   the   land.      And   when   Shechem   the   son   of   Hamor   the Hivite,   the   prince   of   the   land,   saw   her,   he   took   her   and   lay   with   her   by   force.      And he   was   deeply   attracted   to   Dinah   the   daughter   of   Jacob,   and   he   loved   the   girl   and spoke   tenderly   to   her.      So   Shechem   spoke   to   his   father   Hamor,   saying,   ‘Get   me   this young   girl   for   a   wife.’   …      But   Jacob’s   sons   answered   Shechem   and   his   father Hamor,   with   deceit,   and   spoke   to   them,   because   he   had   defiled   Dinah   their   sister …,      ‘Only   on   this   condition   will   we   consent   to   you:   if   you   will   become   like   us,   in that   every   male   of   you   be   circumcised.’   …     And   all   who   went   out   of   the   gate   of   his city   listened   to   Hamor   and   to   his   son   Shechem,   and   every   male   was   circumcised, all   who   went   out   of   the   gate   of   his   city.      Now   it   came   about   on   the   third   day,   when they   were   in   pain,   that   two   of   Jacob’s   sons,   Simeon   and   Levi,   Dinah’s   brothers, each   took   his   sword   and   came   upon   the   city   unawares,   and   killed   every   male.   …     Then   Jacob   said   to   Simeon   and   Levi,   ‘You   have   brought   trouble   on   me,   by   making me   odious   among   the   inhabitants   of   the   land,   among   the   Canaanites   and   the Perizzites;   and   my   men   being   few   in   number,   they   will   gather   together   against   me and   attack   me   and   I   shall   be   destroyed,   I   and   my   household.’      But   they   said, ‘Should he treat our sister as a harlot?’” (Genesis 32:1-4,13,15,24,25,30,31).
Everybody Makes Mistakes It   is   true   that   all   people   make   mistakes,   or   sin.      This   truth   is captured   in   the   famous   proverb   expressed   by   the   18 th    century   English poet,   Alexander   Pope,   when   he   said,   “To   err   is   human;   to   forgive, divine.”      The   Bible   confirms   it   in   Paul’s   statement,   “For   all   have   sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23). On   the   other   hand,   “everybody   makes   mistakes”   might   often be   expressed   as   a   means   of   relieving   guilt   for   mistakes   made.     As   such, it   is   an   excellent   illustration   of   the   fallacy   of   “moral   equivalency,” which treats all sins as if they were equal.  They are not. Yes,    everybody    makes    mistakes,    but,    first,    not    everybody exacerbates   their   mistakes   by   continuing   them.      Christians   are   not distinctive   by   virtue   of   the   fact   that   they   are   perfect,   while   everybody else   is   imperfect.      Instead,   they   are   distinguished   by   the   fact   that, when   they   do   make   mistakes,   or   sin,   they   repent   of   them   and   strive   for improvement.      They   do   not   continue   to   wallow   in   the   mire   of   sin   and console   themselves   with   the   thought   that   at   least   everybody   else   is   in the   mire   with   them.      Rather,   they   get   up   and   clean   themselves   off   by the blood of Christ and try to do better the next time. Second,   not   all   sins   are   equal.      Some   have   more   serious,   even irreparable,    consequences    and,    thus,    require    a    heart    which    can contemplate   those   consequences   but   still   be   indifferent   to   the   hurt they   cause   others.      It   would   be   ridiculous   for   the   murderer   to   say,   “At least   I   don’t   litter.”      Victims   of   littering   usually   survive;   victims   of murder   do   not.      Jesus   said   to   Pilate,   “…   He   who   delivered   Me   up   to you has the   greater sin.” (Jn. 19:11). When   Jacob’s   sons   responded   to   the   rebuke   of   their   father   for the   murder   of   the   Shechemites   by   saying,   “Should   he   treat   our   sister as   a   harlot?”   they   were   attempting   to   justify   themselves   by   an   appeal to   moral   equivalency.      Shechem’s   sexual   crime,   as   bad   as   it   was,   did not warrant murdering and pillaging a whole city. Even   though   all   mistakes,   or   sins,   do   not   rise   to   the   same   level of   seriousness,   all   sins   require   the   same   remedy:      the   blood   of   Christ, which   is   made   available   to   them   for   their   cleansing,   as   they   repent   of their   sins.      So,   the   solution   to   the   sin   in   a   person’s   life   is   not   to   excuse, ignore,   or   minimize   it   by   implying   that   he   is   no   worse   than   anybody else, but to repent of sin and stop it.
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